Friday, September 25, 2015

Indian Pipes


Do you know about Indian Pipe Plant ? 

Other common names for the plant are Ghost Flower and Corpse Plant, references to the sickly grey-white color of the stalks, leaves, and flowers.

Indian Pipes had some medicinal uses. Both the Native Americans and the European settlers used this plant for medicine. The sap was used as an ophthalmic lotion for treating inflamed eyes or for sharpening vision.


 Externally used for treating bunions and warts. This plant was used as a poultice for treating sores. The stems and leaves were used fresh or dried as a tea for treating aches,pains and fevers. The roots were dried and powered as a tea to treat convulsions, fainting spells, fits, epilepsy, insomnia, muscular spams and nervous irritability.


 Indian Pipes also had some edible uses. It could be eaten raw, roasted, or boiled.

Although it often tasted like Asparagus it was considered to be
bland and tasteless.

 However, this plant contains toxic glycosides, such as andromedotoxin. This plant’s safe use is questionable plus the plant is too scarce to harvest.

I have a few in our yard. When we moved into the house Indian Pipes were everywhere. 


18 comments:

  1. What a curious thing, Linda! I've never seen them, but I can sure see how they get the name ghost flower! Very cool.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Rita. I wanted to add the post because they haven't been around the past few years. Maybe since it was so cold this winter maybe they decided to appear again.

      Delete
  2. This is the first I've heard of an Indian Ghost Flower. How fascinating what all this plant can supposedly do for people. I swear Linda-back in the day? Some of these natural remedies from plants and what not worked a heck of a lot better than these synthetic things made in labs that we get now. If only we could find the "medicine men or women" to make them up huh?

    The flowers are pretty in an eerie kind of way.....almost like the black stripes are painted on.

    You teach the COOLEST STUFF! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Carol. I love adding stuff and if someone else appreciates it then it's a win.

      Delete
  3. They are just beautiful! I wish they grew around here!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paddi

      When we moved to this area over 30 years ago there were so many of them. Now they are rare.

      Delete
  4. Never heard of them. Interesting looking. Sure could have used them for my bunions years and ages ago. I really enjoy hearing about the way plants and flowers can be used for other things. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. These are old. When they first come up they are white. I'm sure we don't have these in Florida

      Delete
  5. I'd never heard of them either. The texture in the photo reminds me of mushrooms on long stems. they are very pretty. I'm always surprised at what is used for medicinal purposes. I wonder why these have disappeared recently if there were so many to begin with. very interesting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a fungus and they were everywhere. Now, I was shocked to see these.

      Delete
  6. I've never heard of them but I think they are awesome. They almost remind me of a mushroom . My Mom had a terrible Bunion . I would have loved to have one for her when she was alive.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's what I love about the blog, sharing things that maybe people might not know about.

      Delete
  7. I have never seen those before. However, they do look like finger bones sticking out of the ground.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't see them as much as I use to but they are truly unique!

      Delete
  8. Great shot! First time I see or read about this plant.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Fascinatingly beautiful. I've never even heard of this plant before. Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete